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29/07/2020

What should you do if you fall into water?

What should you do if you fall into water?

“Lay back and calm yourself down. Even if you just have your face out of the water, you can breathe. Get some air in your lungs to help you float. Try to get someone’s attention by waving your hands or yelling.”

How do you survive if you fall into a river?

Look downstream and keep calm, breathe with the flow of the water, to keep from swallowing too much water. When you come up on a calmer area, flip over and swim diagonally toward shore, with the flow of the current. 2. The other less popular method is to swim on your stomach, head-first downstream.

Is swimming in river dangerous?

Reservoirs, rivers, disused quarries and other water bodies can be perfect places to visit, but they can be dangerous. Water may look safe, but it can be hazardous, which is why it’s important to spot and keep away from dangers.

Why is it dangerous to swim in the river?

Many people do not understand the force of water in a river. If you swim out of a swimming hole into the river current you can be swept down the river by the force of the water. You could be pulled underwater by the force of the current or pushed against an obstacle like a rock and be trapped and drown.

Can Rip currents kill you?

Moving at speeds of up to eight feet per second, rip currents can move faster than an Olympic swimmer. Lifeguards rescue tens of thousands of people from rip currents in the U.S. every year, but it is estimated that 100 people are killed by rip currents annually. If caught in a rip current, don’t fight it!

What happens when you get caught in a riptide?

If you’re caught in a rip current, the first thing to do is remain calm. A rip current won’t pull you underwater. It’ll just pull you away from shore. If you feel that you’re able to swim, do so parallel to the shore until you’re out of the current and then swim back to shore at an angle.

Can you see a rip current from shore?

One of the best visual identifiers of a rip current is to look out for gaps between the waves. Rip currents tend to drag large amounts of sand and sediment back out to sea with them, so many rip currents are easily identified by a noticeable jet of crud in the water extending away from the shore.